The roses are in season. That sounds funny to say the roses are “in season” but I suppose everything is in season at one point or another, everyone and everything has a season, some longer than others. We have a rose arbor at Tulipwood, my great grandfather built it after he bought Tulipwood from the Adam’s family. Can you believe The Adams Family lived at Tulipwood once upon a time? At the turn of the 19th century no less… this is all sounding strangely suspicious. I’m having a revelation as I type.

But the roses are in season. The rose arbor is old with gnarled tree trunks for posts, which makes it look like an old man. We’ve stabilized it from time to time and added fresh wood to the ceiling, but it will always look like an old man.

I picked some young fresh buds last week to make some tea. Because sometimes, when life becomes unruly like mine has of late, rose petal tea is a great soothing thing.

There won’t be buds for much longer. A lot of the petals have fully bloomed and are falling to the ground and beginning their annual rot into dirt in order to start the cycle all over again for next year.

But there were a few, and I took them for myself.

Aren’t they lovely? There are white ones too. In fact there was some family drama for a while over the color of the roses at the rose arbor and what they should be. They have always been white or light pink. But I went out to buy more roses and felt inspired by bold colors and bought yellow, and fuscia and something else that I can’t remember because as you can probably guess… those ones miraculously “didn’t make it.” Was it a sign from my great grandfather? Or was someone more earth bound wickedly having their way? We’ll never know. Because everything is light pink and white now.

They need to be dried, for several days or more. You can leave them on the stem to start…

Then you can rip them all of as if you’re a bridesmaid, except you throw them on your own windowsill and admire them for a while.

Once they are crisp, they go into your favorite tea cup, or a tin for a rainy day.

Give them a nice dose of piping hot water…

Let it brew for a while, it is not a strong tea after all…

And have your tea. And recall the days and anticipate the days that are not kidnapped by life.

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If you liked this, you might also like:

Homemade Tea Bags by Easy Peasy Organic

Christmas Chai by Easy Peasy Organic

Chamomile Tea by Georgia Pellegrini

Cold Brew Iced Coffee by The Pioneer Woman

“Rose Petal Tea”

Prep Time: 24 hours

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 24 hours, 5 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

“Rose Petal Tea”

Ingredients

  • 1 packed cup of rose buds and young petals
  • Hot water

Instructions

  1. Pick the rose buds, preferably in early morning, choosing ones that are still wrapped fairly tightly in the bud.
  2. Loosen them from the bud and let them dry for several days in the sun.You can also let them dry slightly on the bud, then finish drying them by plucking them from the stem.
  3. Place 2 heaping tablespoons in a tea cup. Cover with hot water and let brew for about 4 minutes. Sip and enjoy when you want the taste of comfort.
http://georgiapellegrini.com/2011/06/23/recipes/rose-petal-tea/