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“Venison Chili”

I love a good chili recipe. Even with the weather warming up, there is something special about a hearty bowl of chili at a summer cookout. Plus, when you have a pot of chili on the stove, your whole house will smell amazing.

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As you can see, a delicious chili recipe takes just a few ingredients…

But I promise it’s so worth it to go foraging into your pantry for a whole bunch of spices because this chili is delicious.

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First you cut up some bacon and start browning it in a pot.

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When its browned and all of those delicious bacon flavors have been rendered, you can start adding the rest of the chili layers. (Those brown bits on the bottom of the pot make for some delicious dishes!)

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Add your onion and garlic and get them sweating. When the onions are translucent, you can add the star ingredient:

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…the meat.

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Then some kidney beans and bright red tomatoes get added to the party.

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Next you’ll add in all of your spices. This is where things start to smell really good. Not that all that bacon and meat browning didn’t already smell good, but now it’s even better.

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Add in your stock and let the chili simmer for about an hour until the stock is full flavored and the chili has simmered down.

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It will taste even better the next day and also freezes well so can be made well in advance. And of course try it with all kinds of ground meat that you like, they will all work well.

“Venison Chili”

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 55 minutes

Yield: Serves 6

“Venison Chili”

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of ground venison
  • 2 strips of bacon
  • 1 16 oz can of kidney beans
  • 3 cups of beef or chicken stock
  • 1 28 oz can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 whole red onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ¼ tsp cayenne
  • 1 tsp ground chili pepper
  • ½ tsp salt to taste
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 3 bay leaves

Instructions

  1. Start by rendering bacon in a heavy bottom pot over medium heat. Render bacon until crispy and golden brown.
  2. Finely dice a red onion and add to the pot with the rendered bacon. Add diced garlic and cook until onion is soft and translucent and garlic is slightly golden.
  3. Add beef and brown for about 5 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces as it cooks.
  4. When the meat is browned, add the spices, rosemary, and bay leaves to the pot.
  5. Add the kidney beans and diced tomatoes, followed by your stock of choice.
  6. Partly cover the pot and let simmer for about an hour and a half until the liquid is full flavored and reduced. Season with salt to taste.
http://georgiapellegrini.com/2014/06/06/recipes/venison-chili/

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