Articles Tagged with: bay leaf
“Braised Venison Tacos”

On Sunday I went to watch an Australian car race at the shiny new track in Austin, but that is for another day. Then I made Venison Tacos! They were tangy and full of crunchy colorful bits.   I highly recommend making a big batch of this and having a taco party. If you don’t have venison try bison, beef, wild boar, elk, pork or whatever you fancy. The idea […]

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“Wild Boar Bolognese”

Happy Wednesday! Let’s celebrate the middle of the week with some hearty, juicy Wild Boar Bolognese, shall we? Here is episode #2. Stay tuned for many more cooking/how-to/DIY episodes you’ll be seeing here on this site. As always I’d love your feedback and questions in the comments section below. It is a work in progress, and like a freshly harvested pheasant, it will get better with time. Stay hungry my […]

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“Venison Roast with Red Wine & Juniper Berries”

A roast is often times made from a tougher cut of meat, a portion of the leg, for example. But I recently decided to turn two aged venison backstraps into a roast, which produced wonderful results in a much shorter time. If you don’t have venison, I highly recommend beef as well. The idea is to fold them over and truss them together with kitchen twine so that they are […]

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“Keys to the Kitchen”

I’m giving away a pretty awesome book today guys and gals. It is by the talented, formidable Aida Mollenkamp, and it just hit bookstores everywhere. It is one of the most comprehensive technique cookbooks I have seen in quite some time. And you will love it. To begin with, there are 300 juicy recipes and beautiful color photographs and illustrations. But what’s more it is a substantial technique primer. It […]

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“Squirrel Brunswick Stew with Acorns”

Young squirrel is good simply quartered and fried. Old squirrel is good stewed. When in doubt, it is safest to braise or stew a squirrel. Sometimes, for flavor and for whimsy, I like to add acorns to this recipe. Native Americans used to eat acorns, usually by grinding them and then boiling them. They are sometimes bitter because of their tannins, but this can be improved by grinding them and […]

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“Homemade Gift: Preserved Salmon in a Jar”

I got a little makeover around here! We’re still working out a few kinks but there are a few new features that I want to point out now so you can start using them! My recipes page now has a visual recipe index as well as a way for you to search for recipes by ingredient. There are also many categories that you can search for visually. I’m a visual […]

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“Pickled Peppers”

These are the peppers from my garden this year. You can call me Peter Piper. Thank you. The truth is, that they were planted by my brother’s mischievous friend Francesco. But Francesco dropped off the radar screen sometime in mid-summer when the weeds became unruly and it was time to separate the men from the boys and weed well into the evening. I think I still have a sunburn from […]

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“How to Can Tomatoes & Other Tomato Tips”

Before I begin, I need to share a tip. I was reminded via twitter by my friend Paul over at Foodcrunch of this important summer tomato rule, so if you take nothing else away but this, I’ll be happy. If you want your juicy summer tomatoes to last longer… simply rest them on the windowsill stem-side down, rather than the commonly seen stem-side up. When I worked in my first […]

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“Beurre Blanc”

Butter sauce, that is, in English speak. Butter is such a magical thing, don’t you think? I call it udder nectar. Sometimes. Only with people who know me well, like you for example. But I usually don’t call it that at a first encounter. You see, we get so caught up in recipes, but sometimes it can be simpler than that. Sometimes butter sauce is all you need to “enlighten” […]

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“Corned Venison”

When Lewis and Clark set out on their Corps of Discovery they struggled to find fresh meat, especially during the coldest winter months. The meat they obtained came from hunting and fishing, through trade, or through the kindness of American Indians. The Corps ate everything from dog, to whale, to horse, and because fresh meat spoils after a few days without refrigeration, what they could find needed to be preserved. […]

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