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“How to Make Fresh Mozarella in 30-Minutes”

A few weeks ago I was blessed to end up, somehow, serendipitously, among some of my favorite people who also happen to be food bloggers. We met at Ree’s ranch in Oklahoma and I’ll tell you more about the magic of the place later. But now, I’ll tell you about some of the deliciousness that ensued. We made fresh mozzarella! Rebecca from Foodie With Family gave us such a wonderful tutorial and so I’m going to share it with you here.

These are some of my cheese friends! From left to right: Bridget, Wendy, Sandy, and Me. This fun photo was taken by Ree, The Pioneer Woman.

This is Charlie the ranch dog, fresh out of his photo shoot.

This is Rebecca who is very pioneering in her food philosophy, and I’ve decided she’s my soul sistah. She’s getting ready to teach us how to make fresh mozarella, along with homemade bread from the remaining whey, as well as some lovely roasted pepper spread.

To make the mozzarella you will need:

1 gallon of whole milk (raw milk will work, much, much better if you can get your hands on it)
1 1/2 teaspoons citric acid powder, either tablet form or powder form
1/4 teaspoon liquid rennet (vegetable or animal) combined with 1 cup of water. This also comes in a tablet form if you so desire.
1-2 teaspoons Kosher salt
Optional: Your favorite seasonings, ie. fresh herbs, olive oil, balsamic, red pepper flakes, chopped garlic

Note: I sell a Mozzarella & Ricotta cheese making kit in my shop if you want to make it easy on yourself!

1. Sprinkle the citric acid into an empty, large non-reactive stockpot. Pour in 1/4 cup water and stir it to dissolve, with the heat off.

2. Pour the milk into the citric acid solution and stir it to combine.

Listen to a Basset Hound snore.

3. Turn the heat on and let the temperature rise to 90 degrees (use an instant read thermometer). You may see the milk is beginning to curdle, which is A-ok.

4. When the milk reaches 90 degrees, remove the pot from the burner and pour in the rennet mixed with water.

5. Give the mixture a gentle circular stir for about 30 seconds. Then use the spoon to stop the motion of the milk so it will “be still.”

6. Place the lid on the pot and walk away for five minutes. When you return after five minutes, the mixture will resemble a very soft custard.


We enjoyed ourselves pressing on the surface of the milk to see how well it had formed a mass. Is there anything better than playing with your food? I think not.

7. With a long knife or offset spatula, cut the curd into a 1-inch checkerboard pattern, making lines across, then lines in the other direction like tick-tack-toe.

8. Return the pot to the the burner  and stir it gently over medium heat until the temperature of the whey (the liquid that separates from the curd) reaches 105 degrees F.

9. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the curd to a colander set over a bowl. It will look stringy and wonderful.

We looked on in awe. And anticipation. Of cheese. Cheese anticipation.

Here was a lovely demonstration of the difference you get when you use raw milk versus homogenized milk. The homogenized will be much more grainy and not as “stringy.” But do not fear, it will all come together in the end even if you use homogenized milk.

In the distance you can see how stringy Rebecca’s scoops are versus Amy’s.

We had fun. Oh how we laughed!

And photographed.

Like paparazzi.

Food Paparazzi!

(Photo by Sandy)

Then more fun comes when you squish the cheese. This is an important step. Squishing the cheese as the last bits make their way into your colander.

10. Slowly spin around the colander once the curds are in to allow the whey to drain from the curd. Laugh as you go, it makes the food taste better.

Amy had a funny time getting the grainy curds to behave from the homogenized milk but it still came out nicely!

11. Remove the cheese from the collander and gently squeeze it a few times to drain off more excess whey.That’s mozzarella there friends!

12. Next, transfer the cheese to a microwave-save bowl and microwave the curd on high for 1 minute.

13. Remove the bowl from the microwave and pour off as much whey as you can. Pour the whey off into a bowl if you want, because you can make a high protein bread with it, or even scones! It’s delicious stuff, why waste?

14. Press the curd together with your hands, give it a nice squeeze to get more whey out.

15. Microwave it again on high for 35 seconds, press the curd together again, and drain some more whey. The idea is that the more whey you get out, the more dense the cheese will be and the longer it will store in the refrigerator… but it may not last to the refrigerator because you may eat it all while it’s still on the counter.

16. Next you stretch! Knead and stretch the curd a bit to drain more whey, then microwave it one last time for 35 seconds.

Stretching is so fun to watch.

So is twisting. You could make a mozzarella braid here if you wanted. Or mini bocconcini balls too.

Here is a beautiful ball of mozzarella.

17. Knead in the salt and roll it into a neat ball.

A few final squeezes here… for shaping and for fun.

18. And second to last, set the ball into an ice water bath and let it rest in there until totally cool.

Pet a Basset Hound’s ears while you wait.

Give him a zen pressure point massage on the forehead.

Watch him go unconscious from the pleasure.

Then watch him lick his paws because that’ll really help you keep your appetite.

And finally, the seasonings! Rebecca set it on a plate and sprinkled fresh herbs like chives, oregano and basil, as well as salt, pepper, chopped fresh garlic, and crushed red pepper over the top.

The herbs really did it for me if you can make it happen.

Then a drizzle of olive oil and balsamic for good measure.

Cut into it and enjoy my friends.

Here is the printable recipe. Go forth and spread cheese! It will create world peace.


“How to Make Fresh Mozarella in 30-Minutes”

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 1 pound

Serving Size: 6

“How to Make Fresh Mozarella in 30-Minutes”

Recipe courtesy of Rebecca from FoodieWithFamily.com

Ingredients

  • 1 gallon of whole milk (raw milk will work, much, much better if you can get your hands on it)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons citric acid powder, either tablet form or powder form
  • 1/4 teaspoon liquid rennet (vegetable or animal) combined with 1 cup of water. This also comes in a tablet form if you so desire.
  • 1-2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • Optional: Your favorite seasonings, ie. fresh herbs, olive oil, balsamic, red pepper flakes, chopped garlic

Instructions

  1. Sprinkle the citric acid into an empty, large non-reactive stockpot. Pour in 1/4 cup water and stir it to dissolve, with the heat off.
  2. Pour the milk into the citric acid solution and stir it to combine.
  3. Turn the heat on and let the temperature rise to 90 degrees (use an instant read thermometer). You may see the milk is beginning to curdle, which is A-ok.
  4. When the milk reaches 90 degrees, remove the pot from the burner and pour in the rennet mixed with water.
  5. Give the mixture a gentle circular stir for about 30 seconds. Then use the spoon to stop the motion of the milk so it will “be still.”
  6. Place the lid on the pot and walk away for five minutes. When you return after five minutes, the mixture will resemble a very soft custard.
  7. With a long knife or offset spatula, cut the curd into a 1-inch checkerboard pattern, making lines across, then lines in the other direction like tick-tack-toe.
  8. Return the pot to the the burner and stir it gently over medium heat until the temperature of the whey (the liquid that separates from the curd) reaches 105 degrees F.
  9. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the curd to a colander set over a bowl. It will look stringy and wonderful.
  10. Slowly spin around the colander once the curds are in to allow the whey to drain from the curd. Laugh as you go, it makes the food taste better.
  11. Remove the cheese from the collander and gently squeeze it a few times to drain off more excess whey.That's mozzarella there friends!
  12. Next, transfer the cheese to a microwave-save bowl and microwave the curd on high for 1 minute.
  13. Remove the bowl from the microwave and pour off as much whey as you can. Pour the whey off into a bowl if you want, because you can make a high protein bread with it, or even scones! It's delicious stuff, why waste?
  14. Press the curd together with your hands, give it a nice squeeze to get more whey out.
  15. Microwave it again on high for 35 seconds, press the curd together again, and drain some more whey. The idea is that the more whey you get out, the more dense the cheese will be and the longer it will store in the refrigerator... but it may not last to the refrigerator because you may eat it all while it's still on the counter.
  16. Next you stretch! Knead and stretch the curd a bit to drain more whey, then microwave it one last time for 35 seconds.
  17. Knead in the salt and roll it into a neat ball.
  18. And second to last, set the ball into an ice water bath and let it rest in there until totally cool.
  19. Plate, top with your favorite seasonings, and enjoy!

Notes

Note 1: It’s best to eat the mozzarella within a day, or it can be kept in a brine (salt water) for up to a week.

Note 2: I sell a Mozzarella & Ricotta cheese making kit in my shop if you want to make it easy on yourself! Link: http://osky.co/xWxkTe You can also get citric acid tablets and liquid vegetable rennet on Amazon or in many different places.

http://georgiapellegrini.com/2012/08/09/recipes/how-to-make-fresh-mozarella-in-30-minutes/

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