Enter your email address:

“Pheasant Confit”

To “confit” something, is to cure it in salt and then cook it slowly in fat. It makes the meat buttery and fall off the bone. Is there anything that sounds more glorious than that?

It is common to see it done with duck legs, and other muscular cuts of meat, but here I’ve done it with a slew of pheasant legs that I brought back from my women’s Adventure Getaway last December. Try this! They last quite a while once they’ve been preserved and cooked in this way and are delicious warm or served room temperature on salads.

_DSC7380 copy

For this recipe you’ll need 6 pheasant legs, the zest of an orange, cloves, fresh thyme, juniper berries, salt and pepper, and grape seed oil. You could swap the grape seed oil for olive oil or duck fat if you prefer.

_DSC7385 copy

You’ll need a baking dish just large enough that your pheasant legs fit snugly. Any excuse to use my heart pan, isn’t it lovely?!

The first step in making a confit is to cure the meat. So we’ll start by pouring a half cup of salt evenly over the legs.

_DSC7386 copy

Add about 5 sprigs of fresh thyme to the dish.

_DSC7388 copyNext, grate and sprinkle the zest of one small orange on top.

Getting prettier by the second…

_DSC7391 copy

Then you’ll crush and add roughly 5 juniper berries.

_DSC7393 copy

Time to get down and dirty. Rub the cure evenly into every nook and cranny of the legs. Then place the legs in the fridge to cure for at least six hours, I left mine overnight. The longer they’re allowed to cure, the saltier the meat will be and the longer the legs will be preserved.

_DSC7435 copy

After the meat has been allowed to cure, rinse the legs and the baking dish thoroughly. Then return the legs to the rinsed dish.

_DSC7440 copy

Completely submerge the legs in grape seed oil. This is the essential step in any confit, but especially with such a lean bird like pheasant. Cooking the bird in oil or fat helps to break down some of those tough tendons, making the meat much more tender…and oh-so delicious!

_DSC7476

Patience is a virtue…bake at 200 degrees for four to six hours. Once the meat is falling off the bone, it’s done!

Strain the oil, and save it for future use, like another confit!

_DSC7478v550

You can serve the pheasant warm out of the oven. Or shred room temperature over a green salad. Dive. In.

“Pheasant Confit”

Prep Time: 24 hours

Cook Time: 6 hours

Total Time: 30 hours

Yield: Serves 6

“Pheasant Confit”

Ingredients

  • 6 Pheasant legs
  • 1/2 cup Kosher Salt
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 5 Cloves
  • 5 Sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 5 Juniper berries, crushed
  • 4 liquid cups of Grape seed oil (Or Olive oil or duck fat)

Instructions

  1. Place pheasant legs snugly in baking dish
  2. Add salt evenly on top
  3. Add the orange zest, cloves, thyme, juniper berries, and pepper
  4. Rub seasoning evenly into every surface of pheasant legs
  5. Cover dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 6 hours, the longer the legs are allowed to cure the saltier they will be, and the longer they will preserve
  6. Once the cure is finished, rinse the legs and baking dish
  7. Return rinsed legs to baking dish and cover with the grape seed oil
  8. Preheat oven to 200 degrees
  9. Cook for 4 to 6 hours, or until the meat falls off of the bone
  10. Strain and save oil for later use
  11. Serve legs warm or room temperature on a salad
http://georgiapellegrini.com/2014/03/26/blog/cooking/pheasant-confit/

Pin It
 

“Whiskey Glazed Wild Turkey Breast”

_DSC8343

I know you’ve been waiting on the edge of your seats, clicking refresh, just dying to know what I did with all of that turkey meat I hauled off the field and field dressed. Right? Right?…. Is this thing on? The moment has come! First up, is Whiskey Glazed Turkey Breast. Turkey and whiskey, what …

“Duck Confit”

_DSC0325v610

I spent all day yesterday recipe testing. My freezer had gotten unruly and I had declared that nothing else was allowed in it so that all of the game meat I had collected since September could have a proper home until I could test it all for the “Girl Hunter” book. That has been the …

“Partridge in Orange Brandy Sauce”

_DSC3821v610

This is a delicious little dish I made while bird hunting in Montana. You should really try it. Even if you don’t have a partridge handy, it will work with other bird meat… like chicken for example. I recommend keeping the bone in whatever meat you use so the meat doesn’t dry out. These are …

“Strawberry Shortcake & Badass Biscuits”

_DSC6735 copy

A few weeks ago I went on a strawberry binge. I was intent on making a strawberry rhubarb pie and my strawberry estimating skills turned out to be terrible, and thus I was left with more strawberries than one pie could hold. So I proceeded to make approximately 1.6 trillion recipes from strawberries. There was …