Cool Stuff – Wild Game
“Wild Boar Meatballs”

I just finished a whirlwind trip to L.A. where I made some meatballs. That’s what I went to L.A. for, to make meatballs! It was the right thing to do. I’ll post about my time there and the hilarity that ensued as soon as I sleep for two days straight, but first, I want to share the meatball recipe that I made so you can make it for Sunday night […]

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“Squirrel Brunswick Stew with Acorns”

Young squirrel is good simply quartered and fried. Old squirrel is good stewed. When in doubt, it is safest to braise or stew a squirrel. Sometimes, for flavor and for whimsy, I like to add acorns to this recipe. Native Americans used to eat acorns, usually by grinding them and then boiling them. They are sometimes bitter because of their tannins, but this can be improved by grinding them and […]

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“Blue Grouse with Roasted Apples and Pears”

These are the facts that we know: 1. There was an apple tree and a pear tree growing nicely outside the cabin minding their own business. They were producing nice fruit and dropping it on the ground at their leisure. 2. In the morning there were claw marks down the side of the pear tree and most of the branches had been torn down. 3. All that remained were these […]

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“Devil Doves”

I’m writing to you from an airplane, 30,000 feet in the sky. Isn’t technology amazing? {{{wave}}} I’m on my way to Portland, Oregon for a weekend of foraging in the woods, good eating, and general merriment. I’ll be sure to tell you what I uncover. In the meantime, we need to talk about doves some more, particularly this new dove recipe I conjured up while in Arkansas a few days […]

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“Wild Turkey Swedish Meatballs”

Raise your hand if you’ve been turkey hunting this season! Or raise your hand if you like turkey! Because this recipe works perfectly with both domestic and wild birds. I know some of you have been telling me your turkey hunting stories via email. It’s a thrilling time, turkey hunting season is, it’s so uncertain and adrenaline pumping. And when you put all of that work into your dinner you […]

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“Whiskey Glazed Wild Turkey Breast”

I know you’ve been waiting on the edge of your seats, clicking refresh, just dying to know what I did with all of that turkey meat I hauled off the field and field dressed. Right? Right?…. Is this thing on? The moment has come! First up, is Whiskey Glazed Turkey Breast. Turkey and whiskey, what could not be good about it? Here is the cast of characters: Turkey breast, whiskey, […]

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“Buttermilk Fried Rabbit”

I know it is a bit early, but I bet some of you are already wondering what to make for Easter. Are you feeling a little provocative? A tad tongue-in-cheek? Then this is what I recommend. It was part of my Arkansas cooking extravaganza a few weeks ago and I thought it was high time to share. Young rabbits are best fried, because they are so tender. The best way […]

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“Corned Venison”

When Lewis and Clark set out on their Corps of Discovery they struggled to find fresh meat, especially during the coldest winter months. The meat they obtained came from hunting and fishing, through trade, or through the kindness of American Indians. The Corps ate everything from dog, to whale, to horse, and because fresh meat spoils after a few days without refrigeration, what they could find needed to be preserved. […]

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“Jerky”

I used to think of it as the strange stuff I’d see in strange gas stations on my strange cross country road trips. It was usually in stick form, a long tubular stick, wrapped in a coating of plastic, with a peculiar name like… Slim Jim, not because it made you slim, but because it was a slim, tubular portion…in a coating of plastic. But then, I made my own. […]

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“Duck Cassoulet”

A cassoulet is an Occitan dish–that part of Southern France where they speak a beautiful and fading romance language, Occitan. It is a stew of beans and meat; sometimes pork, sometimes goose, or mutton or whatever else they please. It is hearty and traditionally cooked in a cassole, a deep earthenware pot with slanted sides. But since I am not Occitan, but me, I cooked mine in a skillet. I […]

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