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“Homemade Gift: Preserved Salmon in a Jar”

I got a little makeover around here! We’re still working out a few kinks but there are a few new features that I want to point out now so you can start using them!

  • My recipes page now has a visual recipe index as well as a way for you to search for recipes by ingredient. There are also many categories that you can search for visually. I’m a visual person so I couldn’t help myself.
  • There is a post archive in case you want to take a little stroll down memory lane. It’s really easy to navigate and see everything on one page.
  • The recipes below each food post will have a save button where you can save it to a recipe box. There will also be a print button so you can print them for a rainy day. This feature is still a work in progress so I’ll update you as things are perfected.

There’s more but that’s all my brain can handle… it’s been quite a project and my friend Carrie Dils did an amazing job developing it. Kristian Russell at Inside Interactive designed the whole thing and he is a master. Thanks guys!

Now that I’ve thrown that out there, I want to share one of my latest homemade gift ideas. I made it for my Christmas party last night and it was a big hit.

It’s cured salmon in a jar filled with oil and spices and other aromatics. In a mason jar it looks just beautiful.

Start by slicing some salmon on a bias into thin slices.

Fill a small non-reactive container with sugar and salt.

Toss it gently so it is fully coated, cover and set in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

Once it is cured, it will be firmer. Rinse it well under running water.

Then get your flavoring ingredients together. You can get really creative here but I used: shallots, garlic, bay leaves, key limes, thyme, sage, black peppercorns, coriander seeds, champagne vinegar and olive oil.

Slice up the key limes and shallots thinly. Peel the garlic cloves and leave them whole.

Stack everything into a mason jar.

You can do it in layers or mix things up.

Pour the olive oil until it covers the ingredients fully. Set it in the refrigerator so that the flavors meld. The oil will become opaque so just be sure to let it come to room temperature before serving.

It’s a very pretty dish which is what I love about it.

It’s also a fun hostess gift because someone could just open it up at the party that you go to and there’s another fun appetizer.

You can also use the leftover oil for a salad dressing once the salmon is finished. It’s sublime because it’s infused with all of those herbs and garlic and shallots.

Give it a try! You’ll just love it.

“Homemade Gift: Preserved Salmon in a Jar”

Prep Time: 24 hours

Cook Time: 24 hours

Total Time: 48 hours

Yield: 1 cup

“Homemade Gift: Preserved Salmon in a Jar”

Ingredients

  • 1 16-oz salmon fillet, skin removed
  • 4 tablespoons Kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 6 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 2 bay leaves,
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 4 fresh sage leaves
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon coriander seeds
  • 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar
  • 1 cup olive oil, or enough to cover

Instructions

  1. Cut the salmon fillet on a bias into thin slices. In a small non-reactive bowl, combine the salt and sugar. Toss the salmon slices in the bowl, cover, and cure in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours.
  2. Remove from the refrigerator and rinse the salmon slices well under running water. Place them in a mason jar and layer with the remaining ingredients, finishing it with the oil until fully covered.
  3. Seal the jar and store in the refrigerator for at least a day before serving to let the flavors infuse. The olive oil will become opaque, so let it come to room temperature before serving. Save the oil once the salmon is consumed and use it for a salad dressing!
http://georgiapellegrini.com/2011/12/11/blog/cooking/homemade-gift-preserved-salmon/

 

“Beurre Blanc”

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Butter sauce, that is, in English speak. Butter is such a magical thing, don’t you think? I call it udder nectar. Sometimes. Only with people who know me well, like you for example. But I usually don’t call it that at a first encounter. You see, we get so caught up in recipes, but sometimes …