Cool Stuff – Wild Foods

Classic Raspberry Jam

When I was a child and well into my teenage years, I used to proclaim myself the wild raspberry queen, battling the birds every late July so that I’d have enough berries to make jam. Eventually my dad began growing domestic raspberry bushes as well as blueberry bushes so it became a berry wonderland at Tulipwood. Many of the commercial jams you buy have large quantities of sugar in them […]

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The Best Edible Flowers to Grow In Your Garden

A handful of edible flowers sprinkled over a summer salad is a sensory experience. Tossed into a cocktail, it elevates a summer evening. On a creamy panna cotta, it is pure magic. So don’t neglect to plant flowers in your garden this year—just make sure they are edible ones! Here are some beauties to consider, which in my opinion are the best edible flowers to grow in your garden this […]

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7 Edibles Right in Your Backyard

There is tremendous value in understanding our intimate relationship to the natural world, and in our hectic fast-paced lives, so many of us forget to stop and smell the rosemary. Here are nutritional benefits of 7 edibles that are right in your backyard, no trip to the grocery store needed!  When you have had your fill of garden squash, pick the blossoms that form on the vines before they bear fruit. […]

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Dandelion Green Salad with Pancetta and Pistachios

I recently did an interview with the Austin American Statesman where I went foraging for some dandelion greens to make this delicious salad from my latest book, Modern Pioneering. I called it “hood lunch,” since it was lunch truly derived from my lovely hood in East Austin. Check out my recipe! Dandelion greens are full of nutrients and right at your fingertips. The flavor packs a punch which I balanced […]

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Grilled Wild Salmon with Apricot Mustard

Update! And the winner is… Pierre Desjardins: “There is a moment in early May, about two days where, for the first time the air is warm, sunlight bathes the delicate young green leaves…the first sidewalk cafés are open, walking leasurly and all the people look young and happy. Greatest time of all the spring season…love it!” Congrats Pierre, you will love this book, and might I add, you are a […]

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Redfish Courtbouillon

A few weeks ago in  Arkansas, my friend Paul Michael made a dish he makes regularly whenever someone has caught a nice redfish or bass. They all call it “coo-bee-on” and so I just assumed it was another one of their local regional dishes that this Yankee was unfamiliar with. And then I saw it written down. “Courtbouillon!” I exclaimed. It’s actually French, and if there’s one thing I know […]

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Spicy Middle Eastern Shrimp

I’m not quite sure what to call this recipe. But since it uses a medley of spices that you’ll find in most Middle Eastern dishes, I’m calling it Spicy Middle Eastern Shrimp. Or we can also call it Darn Good. Or Shrimp That Rawks. Or I Can’t Believe It’s Not Shrimp. Nevermind. You’ll need: shrimp, fresh mint, Aleppo pepper flakes, black peppercorns, cardamom, cinnamon, coriander, dried ginger root, fennel seed, […]

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How to Clean & Cook Soft Shell Crabs

Soft shell crabs are in season! “Soft shell” is just the term used when regular crabs have recently molted their outer shell. Blue crabs for example, are most common. Ideally you buy them when they’re still alive and bring them home for a feast. They are in season May through September, but can be found frozen the rest of the year typically. Oh, and did I mention they’re delicious? And […]

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Poached Loquats in Herb Semi-Syrup

It all began when I was watching the squirrels. This is what I do sometimes when I sit in a wicker chair with my breakfast and ponder life and the creek below. The squirrels were gnawing most voraciously on a yellow fruit, many of which had dropped to the ground. I was curious. So I wandered my way over and this is what I saw, dangling from the trees that […]

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